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Chitosan Coagulation Pretreatment to Enhance Ceramic Water Filtration for Household Water Treatment

Chitosan Coagulation Pretreatment to Enhance Ceramic Water Filtration for Household Water Treatment

Publication Year:
2021
Authors:
Coleman, Collin Knox; Mai, Eric; Miller, Megan; Sharma, Shalini; Williamson, Clark; Oza, Hemali; Holmes, Eleanor; Lamer, Marie; Ly, Christopher; Stewart, Jill; Sobsey, Mark D.; Abebe, Lydia S.
Language:
English
Affiliated Orgs.:
USAID
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Summary:
The role of the gut microbiome in the development of colorectal cancer and discusses the potential of microbiome-based interventions for the prevention and treatment of this disease.
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Resource Information

Abstract

Viruses are major contributors to the annual 1.3 million deaths associated with the global burden of diarrheal disease morbidity and mortality. While household-level water treatment technologies reduce diarrheal illness, the majority of filtration technologies are ineffective in removing viruses due to their small size relative to filter pore size. In order to meet the WHO health-based tolerable risk target of 10−6 Disability Adjusted Life Years per person per year, a drinking water filter must achieve a 5 Log10 virus reduction. Ceramic pot water filters manufactured in developing countries typically achieve less than 1 Log10 virus reductions. In order to overcome the shortfall in virus removal efficiency in household water treatment filtration, we (1) evaluated the capacity of chitosan acetate and chitosan lactate, as a cationic coagulant pretreatment combined with ceramic water filtration to remove lab cultured and sewage derived viruses and bacteria in drinking waters, (2) optimized treatment conditions in waters of varying quality and (3) evaluated long-term continuous treatment over a 10-week experiment in surface waters. For each test condition, bacteria and virus concentrations were enumerated by culture methods for influent, controls, and treated effluent after chitosan pretreatment and ceramic water filtration. A > 5 Log10 reduction was achieved in treated effluent for E.coli, C. perfringens, sewage derived E. coli and total coliforms, MS2 coliphage, Qβ coliphage, ΦX174 coliphage, and sewage derived F+ and somatic coliphages.

Resource Type

Journal Article

Publication Year

2021

Author

Coleman, Collin Knox; Mai, Eric; Miller, Megan; Sharma, Shalini; Williamson, Clark; Oza, Hemali; Holmes, Eleanor; Lamer, Marie; Ly, Christopher; Stewart, Jill; Sobsey, Mark D.; Abebe, Lydia S.

Language

English

Organizational Affiliation

USAID

Relevant Country

United States

Specific Contaminants

Viruses, Bacteria, MS2 coliphage, Qβ coliphage, ΦX174 coliphage, F+ coliphage, somatic coliphage, Escherichia coli, Total coliform, Escherichia coli, Total coliform, C. perfringens

University Affiliation

UNC Water Institute, Emory University

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